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Difference between swiss and german

We have previously said that in different regions of Germany they speak different dialects that differ from written literary German and from each other. Then we talked about Austrian German and its features. Today, in order to finally understand this issue, we will examine Swiss German (Schweizerhochdeutsch). As in Germany and in Austria, literary German (Hochdeutsch) is legally recognized, however, the Swiss version of the German language or the literary Swiss language (Schweizerhochdeutsch) is mainly used. This is a German, in which the phonetics is slightly modified and additional words are used, but it is still understandable to all German-speaking people. But, alas, the literary Swiss German is not quite what we can hear when arriving in the country of banks, cheese and chocolate. The doormen, for the most part, speak the so-called Schwiizerdütsch, the Swiss dialect, which generally has little resemblance to German and exists only verbally. Moreover, the variant of this dialect differs from one canton to another. Some even joke that in Switzerland every 5 meters they say something differently. The Swiss dialect is distinguished by the meaning of some words: “der Zügeln” (bridle / leash) in German and “zügeln” (move) in Schwiizerdütsch. Some kinds of nouns and their plural are also different: “der Park” – “die Pärke”, and not “die Parks” as in literary German. The essential difference is the presence of many words that are borrowed from French: “Billet” instead of German “Fahrkarte” (ticket / travel card), “Velo” instead of “Fahrrad” (bicycle), “Mobiltelefon” instead of “Handy” (mobile phone), etc. d. There are differences even in the letter. In Swiss German, “ß” is not used, instead it is always written “ss”. The most famous greeting in the Swiss language is “Grüezi”, but it is only one among many. The Swiss say the same: “Sali” or “Salü” (= Salut), “Tschau” (= Ciao), and sometimes “Hoi”. The familiar “Guten Morgen / Guten Tag / Guten Abend” will sound like “Gute Morge / Gute Tag / Gute Obig”. In any case, Hochdeutsch needs to be taught, because it is literary German that will be needed at work and in school. In addition, the dialect form of German does not have a clear grammar, which makes its independent study almost impossible. But do not despair, knowing literary German at a good level, learning to understand everyday conversations of the Swiss will be only a matter of time. Finally, we want to give a link to a funny video of a German comedian, even without a full understanding of what was said, you can listen to how Svitzerdyuch sounds:
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